Author Topic: Posting Payments  (Read 2461 times)

lcrofton

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Posting Payments
« on: February 18, 2010, 06:47:18 PM »
OK, it's been 14 years since I've been in the medical billing profession and am a little rusty not to mention lots has changed.  (Lucky to have been able to stay home with my kids) Anyway, just started working at a small pediatric therapy clinic owned by a non-medical gentleman.  =)  Major discussion came up yesterday between his new biller(no exp but accounting background), the office mgr and myself regarding proper billing practice of posting payments.  If a patient has a balance on their account, comes in to be seen... lets say they missed paying their copay the last 3 visits.  Is it common practice to post the copay for todays visit to today?

Any help is appreciated.

kwardbilling

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Re: Posting Payments
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2010, 09:44:02 AM »
I always post the payment to the oldest due copay.....

PMRNC

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Re: Posting Payments
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2010, 01:59:28 PM »
Proper accounting would be to post the corresponding copay to the date of service the copay corresponds with. For example if Mrs. Jones has 3 outstanding copay's due @$10.00 each = $30.00 If she comes in on the 4th visit and pays all of balance plus that day's copays, each posted payment of $10.00 each would get posted to their corresponding date of service. Now let's say she comes in and gives you the $30.00 but doesn't pay for today's visit, you would go back and post the $30 to the previous visits and she'd be left with $10 copay owed. If she comes in and just pays today's copay, that should get posted for that date (today). What I do for my offices works great. They confirm appointments so they will get a copy of their schedule with balances and then when they make the reminder call they can remind the patient to bring in their previous balances (copay's)
Linda Walker
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ellie

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Re: Posting Payments
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2010, 07:43:34 PM »
patient's coinsurance is $ 321.00 they only pay $ 200.00. remaining balance is $ 131.00 Patient returns to clinic coinsurance again is $ 321.00 only can pay $ 200.00 do you  pay off his remaining balance due and leave remaining for current coinsurance ?

Pay_My_Claims

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Re: Posting Payments
« Reply #4 on: February 28, 2010, 07:10:20 AM »
patient's coinsurance is $ 321.00 they only pay $ 200.00. remaining balance is $ 131.00 Patient returns to clinic coinsurance again is $ 321.00 only can pay $ 200.00 do you  pay off his remaining balance due and leave remaining for current coinsurance ?

Of course, the total balance owed would still remain the same. If you don't do that, you have several days of open balances, it will make your AR huge not doing it regardless of it being the "proper" way to do it.

Sportsmom

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Re: Posting Payments
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2010, 05:55:15 PM »
I have a questions a long this line. I'm still working for a mental health office.

Our biller does not posted missed co-pays to the accounts until after the insurances pays. So if a claims does not pay for 6 mo's for what every reason then it pays we may send a client a bill 6 months after they stop coming in also I ask her for a outstanding balance sheet each month she will not add the missed co pays on it until the insurances  pays. Does anyone else do it that way? I have always posted the missed co-pay great way.


Michele

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Re: Posting Payments
« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2010, 09:08:40 PM »
First of all, copays should be paid at the time of service.  Of course we all know that there is always a reason that some don't.  But in that case, the patient should be billed ASAP.  The closer to the date of service that the patient is billed, the more likely to be paid.

Michele
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oneround

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Re: Posting Payments
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2010, 02:18:02 AM »
If I'm not mistaken, it's also in most contracts that the insured is responsible for any and all copays at TOS.  Heck, they get the book, they just don't read it
Michael A. Reynolds, CPC, CCP-P, CPMB, OS
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Corporate Compliance
Sharp HealthCare

PMRNC

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Re: Posting Payments
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2010, 07:29:27 AM »
In the policy between the insured and the insurance company it will have verbiage on "out of pocket expenses" but most of them will not term the language to read it's due at the time of service, it's just legal language to establish a patient's cost sharing in the policy. It's up to each individual practice to set this in stone. I have one pediatrician who we NEVER have to bill patients for copay's, that's because upon check in they have to pay their co-pay, it's in the office policy which the patient is given and signs and also their receptionist verifies appointments and reminds patients the copay must be brought in. There is also a sign right when you go to check in  "Your copay is not only appreciated but is required at each visit with no exceptions" A bit harsh but like I said, I don't do any statements for copay's!
Linda Walker
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ssherman

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Re: Posting Payments
« Reply #9 on: April 27, 2010, 06:36:39 PM »
General rule of thumb for payment posting:

If the date of service/procedure is known for the amount being posted, post the amount to the correct date of service/procedure.
If the date of service is not known, post the amount to the oldest date of service first.
If the amount to apply to a given procedure is not known, post to the lowest charge first, then the second lowest charge, etc.
Post your zero pays.

It helps to keep the books clean and up to date, and usually makes your write-offs easier in the long run.