Author Topic: Closing a practice  (Read 1439 times)

DMK

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Closing a practice
« on: March 09, 2011, 04:08:39 PM »
A colleague recently passed away, and the wife has been left to close the office.  I wondered how the files would be dealt with.  My MD closed his office and I have no idea where my file went.

In the event of a practitioner closing an office or, if the practitioner dies, how are the files disposed of?  Do you offer the file to the patient, does the spouse have to store it, does someone have to retain the file? What are the legalities?


PMRNC

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Re: Closing a practice
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2011, 06:15:21 PM »
It has to be retained in a trust, this definitely requires legal assistance. I would have the wife contact an estate lawyer. The records do have to be retained.
Linda Walker
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rdmoore2003

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Re: Closing a practice
« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2011, 02:46:22 PM »
I agree.   I had to help one of my old providers close her practice due to her "calling" was to do missionary work in different countries for those less fortunate.   What we did was since she had priviledges at a nearby hospital was first she ran a big ad in the local newspaper with the date she was closing and that all records would be given to the hospital so that all patients could get access to them in a timely manner.   If my memory is correct, (dont quote me), she gave a 60 day notice in the ad.  Now, her office was also located in a building that was owned by the hospital.  I dont know if the ladder has any importance....   she did speak with her atty first though. 
Regina

PMRNC

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Re: Closing a practice
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2011, 09:13:29 AM »
Quote
I agree.   I had to help one of my old providers close her practice due to her "calling" was to do missionary work in different countries for those less fortunate.   What we did was since she had priviledges at a nearby hospital was first she ran a big ad in the local newspaper with the date she was closing and that all records would be given to the hospital so that all patients could get access to them in a timely manner.   If my memory is correct, (dont quote me), she gave a 60 day notice in the ad.  Now, her office was also located in a building that was owned by the hospital.  I dont know if the ladder has any importance....   she did speak with her atty first though. 

And trust me, it's MUCH more difficult when dealing with a deceased provider. An estate lawyer is ABSOLUTELY required. They will tell you what to do and where to go from there. They will also be responsible for allocating funds to pay any outstanding bills. This does not mean you will get paid.. It will go in order of priority and of course after settlement of the estate. I almost walked right into a mess with the wife of a provider who passed away, upon discussing it with my attorney and negotiating with theirs, It would be more than 6 months before I received payment so I did not take this on. There were back taxes due, etc, was just a nightmare I wasn't going to take on.. AND they had an attorney!
Linda Walker
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One Stop Resources, Education and Networking for Medical Billers
www.billerswebsite.com

rofakamd

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Re: Closing a practice
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2011, 06:00:20 PM »
you can contact the local ama or state licensing board... they may have suggestions and options that wont be charged for as a lawyer would....

PMRNC

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Re: Closing a practice
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2011, 07:01:37 AM »
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you can contact the local ama or state licensing board... they may have suggestions and options that wont be charged for as a lawyer would....

For something like this they are going to advise an estate lawyer, why wouldn't a practice want to legally cover their butt on something so important?
Linda Walker
Practice Managers Resource & Networking Community
One Stop Resources, Education and Networking for Medical Billers
www.billerswebsite.com