Author Topic: Getting providers/accounts  (Read 913 times)

Ruthie1972

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Getting providers/accounts
« on: October 11, 2016, 09:25:34 AM »
Hi there
Can you please give me some suggestions on how to get accounts? I have been  a certified medical biller for over 5 years, I have worked for companies and I did try to start my own business about 5 years ago with no luck. I went door to door and gave out a packet of my what my business could offer and no one ever signed. I gave up and just went to work for someone. I would like to try this again. Thank you for your suggestions. Have a great day. I am versed in ER, Hospitalist and Anesthesia billing.

williamportor

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Re: Getting providers/accounts
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2016, 07:20:17 PM »
Hello - Your door to door idea was a good one, but instead of packets, I'd suggest investing in some high quality business cards. When you stop by, ask to speak with the office manager, briefly explain the services you offer, leave your card, and move on. You can also leave them with the front desk person, and ask them to pass it on to the doctor. Literature tends to get thrown away quickly, but business cards are more likely to be saved. Be consistent with your efforts and you'll see results. We've had response from doctors that have kept our cards for 1-2 years before calling us. Hint: List the services you offer on the back of your card.

If you sign up a client in the first 1-2 months, count yourself lucky! This is a very tough market to break in to. There are far more medical billers than their are doctors that want them, in addition, a start up biller is competing with some very large billing companies with big marketing budgets, most office managers look upon you as someone out to steal their jobs, most medical professionals will stubbornly cling to using traditional in house office staff, even if it costs them far more than using an outside biller, some of your doctor clients will retire, leave the profession, or simply hire you to clean up their billing mess, only to take it back in house and give it to their relative who messed it up in the 1st place (this happened to me twice) I've been going door to door, and doing telephone prospecting for almost 3 years now, of the 12 clients I've signed up, I have 5 left (4 of them very small), and make less than $500.00 per month. Freelance Medical billing is great work if you can get it, getting clients that pay well, and stay with you however is like looking for a diamond on the dark side of the moon. 
« Last Edit: October 13, 2016, 04:45:00 PM by williamportor »

kristin

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Re: Getting providers/accounts
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2016, 08:25:51 PM »
ER billing is done through the hospital billing department, isn't it? Or maybe not? I don't know that you will get any clients in that area. The potential problem with the other two specialties you listed is that they are usually in larger group practices, with billing/coding departments to handle things.

So what to do? I would focus on expanding your parameters, and look at newer solo practice/newer small group practices, who may need someone. Use whatever contacts you have made in the medical world to network with. Maybe someone is looking for a new billing option.

Or, forgo the idea of starting your own company, and pick up remote billing work if you can, for another billing company. If you are specialized enough, it isn't hard. I wasn't even looking for remote work, and just because of my answers to questions on various billing forums, I suddenly found myself working three remote jobs in addition to my full time job. Less hassle/work than owning a billing company, for sure.

Finally, there are numerous threads at this forum about how to get that first client. Use the search function above, and review older posts. There is a lot of info to be found there.

Michele

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Re: Getting providers/accounts
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2016, 08:10:07 AM »
Actually most ER physicians do independent billing from the hospitals and it can be very good billing.  They don't have offices or staff so they almost always outsource.  The problem is that they also usually already have a billing service so it's hard to get them to switch.  Usually they really don't even know if the billing service is doing a good job.  We used to have a good friend who was an ER doctor.  They paid 13% and that was in the early '90s!  He was unhappy but never did anything about it.  (We weren't in billing yet so that's why we didn't take over.)  Also there is usually a group of them so they have to all agree on the switch.

Williamportor gave some very good advice.  Marketing is the hardest part of this business.  Getting started is tough.  Once you get clients it is a bit easier to get more, but that first one is the toughest.  It's a numbers game and you just have to keep trying.  Talk to anyone you know.  Make sure they know what you are doing.  Everybody goes to doctors and sometimes they know a little about what happens with the billing.  The more you tell people the more the word gets out about you.  There are lots of marketing tips if you go back and review some of the older posts.

Anesthesia is a good field because they too usually don't have regular offices since they don't usually see patients in the office.

Best of luck to you this time around!
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Ruthie1972

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Re: Getting providers/accounts
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2016, 10:07:40 AM »
ER billing is done through the hospital billing department, isn't it? Or maybe not? I don't know that you will get any clients in that area. The potential problem with the other two specialties you listed is that they are usually in larger group practices, with billing/coding departments to handle things.

So what to do? I would focus on expanding your parameters, and look at newer solo practice/newer small group practices, who may need someone. Use whatever contacts you have made in the medical world to network with. Maybe someone is looking for a new billing option.

Or, forgo the idea of starting your own company, and pick up remote billing work if you can, for another billing company. If you are specialized enough, it isn't hard. I wasn't even looking for remote work, and just because of my answers to questions on various billing forums, I suddenly found myself working three remote jobs in addition to my full time job. Less hassle/work than owning a billing company, for sure.

Finally, there are numerous threads at this forum about how to get that first client. Use the search function above, and review older posts. There is a lot of info to be found there.

Ruthie1972

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Re: Getting providers/accounts
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2016, 10:10:52 AM »
Thank you all so very much. I love all the tips. I know it is very difficult to get into, I used to work for a very large company that provided the billing service for the ER and hospitalists at HCA hospitals throughout the country. I also became a supervisor and worked with a lot of the doctors who were very unhappy with the large company, but it is hard once they are contracted in to get them to go with a small person like myself. I would love to find remote work but that is not so easy either. IF anyone knows of any companies to try I would also appreciate that. Thanks again so much .Have a good day.

Michele

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Re: Getting providers/accounts
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2016, 11:10:06 AM »
I used to work for a very large company that provided the billing service for the ER and hospitalists at HCA hospitals throughout the country. I also became a supervisor and worked with a lot of the doctors who were very unhappy with the large company, but it is hard once they are contracted in to get them to go with a small person like myself.

That is what I see too.  They get contracted in with a large company in another state and have no control over anything and are unhappy but can't do much about it.

You will find something!  Keep at it.  Alice and I got very discouraged in the beginning.  If we didn't have each other we may not have persevered!

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