Author Topic: 2 questions  (Read 40 times)

williamportor

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2 questions
« on: October 10, 2017, 08:36:59 PM »
1. Several of my newer customers don't verify insurance coverage. They simply treat anyone with an insurance card, stating they "don't have time to do this" then leave it to me to get the claims paid, this wastes my time an effort...should I verify coverage on all patients before submitting claims as part of my billing process? Should I charge extra for this?

2. I have a massage therapist that say's he cannot pay me on time, since he doesn't have the money because the claims I've submitted recently have not been paid yet. He owes me $400.00, half of which is past due. I told him if he pays $100.00 now and the rest by the end of October that will be fine. Was this the right thing to do? Should I have demanded payment in strict accordance with our contract? 

Michele

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Re: 2 questions
« Reply #1 on: October 11, 2017, 07:41:58 AM »
1. Several of my newer customers don't verify insurance coverage. They simply treat anyone with an insurance card, stating they "don't have time to do this" then leave it to me to get the claims paid, this wastes my time an effort...should I verify coverage on all patients before submitting claims as part of my billing process? Should I charge extra for this?
If your current agreement doesn't include insurance verification then you need to add it in and adjust your fee.  Of course on clients that you already have a contract with you would have to consult with them to make sure they are ok with that.  Going forward you can simply include it.


2. I have a massage therapist that say's he cannot pay me on time, since he doesn't have the money because the claims I've submitted recently have not been paid yet. He owes me $400.00, half of which is past due. I told him if he pays $100.00 now and the rest by the end of October that will be fine. Was this the right thing to do? Should I have demanded payment in strict accordance with our contract? 

The bottom line is you need to be paid.  So if he agreed to what you offered then that is ok.  Of course you have the right to demand payment but that doesn't mean you will get payment.  We have a few "problem" clients that are late paying.  Communication is the key.  If you don't say anything they think it's ok.  You can be firm without being unreasonable and then you can maintain the relationship.  But don't get yourself in a situation where you've done a ton of work and then get no payment.  They stop your service and you're out.  Of course you have the contract but it's not easy to go the court route to resolve the issue.
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PMRNC

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Re: 2 questions
« Reply #2 on: October 11, 2017, 11:32:37 AM »
I agree with Michele, if it's not in your contract, you need to add it and adjust your fees. I PERSONALLY like to do these because I know it's done and done right, so my flat fee (based on time) is inclusive and includes all things associated with FPM which includes verifying benefits and eligibility.

Quote
2. I have a massage therapist that say's he cannot pay me on time, since he doesn't have the money because the claims I've submitted recently have not been paid yet. He owes me $400.00, half of which is past due. I told him if he pays $100.00 now and the rest by the end of October that will be fine. Was this the right thing to do? Should I have demanded payment in strict accordance with our contract? 

I think we've all done something similar to be the "nice guy" however ask yourself this: If he had an employee in the office to which he was responsible for providing a paycheck to, would it be ok for him to tell them "Hey, I can't pay you this week".  The answer is a resounding NO.  If you've already made the offer, I would tell him this will be a ONE time deal and refer to the terms of your contract. If you allow it on an ongoing basis it won't get better, only worse. Your a business too. He isn't able to tell his accountant or malpractice insurance company he can't pay his premium, you should be no different. Trust me when you give an inch they will take a few miles.

Linda Walker
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